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Symb Symm

Symbiosis

/ˌsimbēˈōsis/  /-bī-/

Noun, pl. symbioses

1. Close and often long-term interaction between two or more different biological species. In 1877, Bennett used the word symbiosis (which previously had been used to depict people living together in community) to describe the mutualistic relationship in lichens. In 1879, the German mycologist Heinrich Anton de Bary defined it as “the living together of unlike organisms.”

The definition of symbiosis is controversial among scientists. Some believe symbiosis should only refer to persistent mutualisms, while others believe it should apply to any types of persistent biological interactions (i.e. mutualistic, commensalistic, or parasitic). (wikipedia.org)

2. A close, prolonged association between two or more organisms of different species that normally benefits both members. (wiktionary.org)

3. The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other. A relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other. (biology-online.org)

4. The living together in more or less intimate association or close union of two dissimilar organisms (as in parasitism or commensalism); especially mutualism. (merriam-webster.com)

Word origin: From Modern Latin, from Greek symbiosis “a living together,” from symbioun “live together,” from symbios “(one) living together (with another), partner,” from syn- “together” + bios “life”

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