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Paraplegia


/ˌparəˈpliːdʒə/

Noun, plural paraplegias

1. Paralysis of the legs and lower part of the body. Paraplegia often involves loss of sensation (of pain, temperature, vibration, and position) as well as loss of motion. It may also include paralysis of the bladder and bowel. Paraplegia may be caused by injury to or disease of the lower spinal cord or peripheral nerves or by such brain disorders as cerebral palsy. (global.britannica.com)

2. An impairment in motor or sensory function of the lower extremities. It is usually caused by spinal cord injury or a congenital condition such as spina bifida that affects the neural elements of the spinal canal. The area of the spinal canal that is affected in paraplegia is either the thoracic, lumbar, or sacral regions.

3. A condition where the lower half of a patient’s body is paralyzed and cannot move. (wiktionary.org)

4. Paralysis of the lower half of the body with involvement of both legs usually due to disease of or injury to the spinal cord. (merriam-webster.com)

Word origin: Latinized form of (Ionic) Greek paraplegie “paralysis of one side of the body,” from paraplessein “strike at the side,” paraplessesthai “be stricken on one side,” from para– “beside” + plessein “to strike”


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