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Human


/ˈ(h)yo͞omən/

Noun, pl. humans

1. Primates of the family Hominidae, and the only extant species of the genus Homo. Humans are characterized by having a large brain relative to body size, with a particularly well developed neocortex, prefrontal cortex and temporal lobes, making them capable of abstract reasoning, language, introspection, problem solving and culture through social learning. This mental capability, combined with an adaptation to bipedal locomotion that frees the hands for manipulating objects, has allowed humans to make far greater use of tools than any other species. Humans are the only extant species known to build fires and cook their food, as well as the only known species to clothe themselves and create and use numerous other technologies and arts. (wikipedia.org)

2. A human being, whether man, woman or child. (wiktionary.org)

3. A bipedal primate belonging to the genus Homo, especially Homo sapiens. (biology-online.org)

Adjective

1. Of or belonging to the species Homo sapiens or its closest relatives. (wiktionary.org)

2. Having the nature or attributes of a human being. (wiktionary.org)

Word origin: From Old French humain, umain (adj.) “of or belonging to man” (12c.), from Latin humanus “of man, human,” also “humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized,” probably related to homo (genitive hominis) “man,” and to humus “earth,” on notion of “earthly beings,” as opposed to the gods (cf. Hebrew adam “man,” from adamah “ground”). Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) “man, male person.”


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