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Geniculate

/jəˈnikyəlit/  /-ˌlāt/ Adjective 1. Bent abruptly, with the structure of a knee. (wiktionary.org) 2. Having kneelike joints; able to bend at an abrupt angle. (wiktionary.org) 3. Bent at a sharp angle. (Google Dictionary) Word origin: From Latin geniculatus, from geniculum “little knee, knot on the stalk of a plant,” diminutive of genu...

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Geniculum

1. A small genu, or angular knee-like structure. It is often used in anatomical nomenclature to designate a sharp knee-like bend in a small structure or organ. For example, in the facial canal, the genicular ganglion is situated on the geniculum of the facial nerve, the point where the nerve changes its direction. (wikipedia.org) 2. Knee. (wiktionary.org) 3. Little knot. (wiktionary.org) Word origin: From Latin geniculatus, from geniculum “little knee, knot on the stalk of a plant,” diminutive of genu...

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Genital

/ˈjenitl/ Adjective 1. Of, or relating to biological reproduction. (wiktionary.org) 2. Of, or relating to the genitalia. (wiktionary.org) (Psychoanalysis) 1. Of, or relating to psychosexual development during puberty. (wiktionary.org) Syn: venereal Noun 1. A person or animal’s external organs of reproduction. (Google Dictionary) Word origin: From Latin genitalis “pertaining to generation or birth” (also a by-name of the goddess Diana), from genitus, past participle of gignere “to...

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Genu

/ˈjēn(y)o͞o/  /ˈjen(y)o͞o/ Noun, pl. genua (Anatomy, Zoology) 1. Knee. (wiktionary.org) 2. A knee-like bend. (wiktionary.org) 3. A part of certain structures resembling a knee, in particular a bend in the corpus callosum of mammals. (Google Dictionary) 4. Hinge joint in the human leg connecting the tibia and fibula with the femur and protected in front by the patella. (wordnetweb.princeton.edu) Syn: Knee Word origin: Latin genu...

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Gingiva

/jinˈjīvə/  /ˈjinjəvə/ Noun, pl. gingivas 1. Part of the soft tissue lining of the mouth. They surround the teeth and provide a seal around them. Compared with the soft tissue linings of the lips and cheeks, most of the gingiva are tightly bound to the underlying bone which helps resist the friction of food passing over them. (wikipedia.org) 2. The gum, consisting of the tissue surrounding the roots of the teeth and covering the jawbone. (wiktionary.org) 3. The tissue (covered by mucous membrane) of the jaws that surrounds the bases of the teeth. (wordnetweb.princeton.edu) 4. The gum. (Google Dictionary) Word origin: From Latin gingiva “gums” (of unknown origin) + -al, suffix forming adjectives from nouns or other adjectives, “of, like, related to,” Middle English -al, -el, from French or directly from Latin...

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