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Coenzyme A

Noun 1.A coenzyme, formed from pantothenic acid and adenosine triphosphate, that is necessary for fatty acid synthesis and metabolism. 2. A coenzyme, notable for its role in the synthesis and oxidation of fatty acids, and the oxidation of pyruvate in the citric acid cycle. It is adapted from cysteamine, pantothenate, and adenosine triphosphate. (Wikipedia.org)   Other forms: coa CoASH HSCoA...

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Cohesion

/kōˈhēZHən/ Noun 1. The act, state or process of sticking together. (biology-online.org) 2. (Physics) The intermolecular force that holds together alike molecules in a substance. (biology-online.org) 3. (Chemistry) The binding together of alike molecules. (biology-online.org) 4. (Botany) The congenital union of the same parts of plants. (biology-online.org) Word origin: From French cohésion, from Latin...

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Cohesive

/kōˈhēsiv/ Adjective 1. Sticking together; tending to hold together. (biology-online.org) 2. Characterized by or causing cohesion. (Google Dictionary) Noun: cohesion

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Collagen

/ˈkäləjən/ Noun, pl. collagens 1. A group of naturally occurring proteins found in animals, especially in the flesh and connective tissues of vertebrates. It is the main component of connective tissue, and is the most abundant protein in mammals, making up about 25% to 35% of the whole-body protein content. Collagen, in the form of elongated fibrils, is mostly found in fibrous tissues such as tendon, ligament and skin, and is also abundant in cornea, cartilage, bone, blood vessels, the gut, and intervertebral disc. (wikipedia.org) 2. (Biochemistry) Any of more than 28 types of glycoprotein that forms elongated fibers, usually found in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue. 3. A fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling. (wordnetweb.princeton.edu) 4. The main structural protein found in animal connective tissue, yielding gelatin when boiled. (Google Dictionary) 5. (Science: protein) The protein substance of the white fibres (collagenous fibres) of skin, tendon, bone, cartilage and all other connective tissue, composed of molecules of tropocollagen, it is converted into gelatin by boiling. Collagenous pertaining to collagen, forming or producing collagen....

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Colon

/ˈkōlən/ Noun, pl. colons 1. The last part of the digestive system in most vertebrates. It extracts water and salt from solid wastes before they are eliminated from the body and is the site in which flora-aided (largely bacterial) fermentation of unabsorbed material occurs. Unlike the small intestine, the colon does not play a major role in absorption of foods and nutrients. However, the colon does absorb water, sodium and some fat soluble vitamins. (wikipedia.org) 2. The part of the large intestine between the cecum and the rectum; it extracts moisture from food residues before they are excreted. (wordnetweb.princeton.edu) 3. The main part of the large intestine, which passes from the cecum to the rectum and absorbs water and electrolytes from food that has remained undigested. Its parts are called the ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon. (Google Dictionary) 4. This structure has 6 major divisions: caecum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum. The total length is approximately 5 feet in the adult and it is responsible for forming, storing and expelling waste matter. (biology-online.org) Syn: Large intestine Word origin: From Greek kolon (with a short initial -o-) “large intestine, food, meat,” of unknown...

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