018 Agonists and Antagonists

018 Agonists and Antagonists

Leslie Samuel IBTV, The Nervous System 119 Comments

In this video, watch as Leslie explains how agonists and antagonists affect the receptor sites of the cell.

Enjoy!

Transcript of Today’s Episode

Hello and welcome to another episode of Interactive Biology TV, where we’re making biology fun! My name is Leslie Samuel. In this episode, Episode 18, I’m going to be talking about agonists and antagonists. It almost sounds like a plot for a movie, but it’s not a movie, unless it’s a movie happening inside your body. Anyhow, for today, let’s get into what we’re going to be talking about.

The first thing we’re going to talk about is “What is an agonist?” An agonist is a molecule that mimics the effect of a neurotransmitter, so it does what that neurotransmitter would normally do. An example of that would be succinylcholine mimics the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. So what I’m going to do is I’m going to draw the receptor here, and here we have the cell membrane of the neuron. I’m going to draw it a little different than I’ve been drawing it before. I’m going to have these as the receptor sites. This is where the acetylcholine normally binds to the nicotinic receptor.

I’m going to draw acetylcholine here, but I’m not going to draw it coming here. What I’m going to do is I’m going to draw something that’s slightly different, let’s just say it’s a different color. It’s a similar shape to acetylcholine, and we’re going to call this succinylcholine. When that comes here and it binds to the receptor, same thing here, it comes and it binds to the receptor, the channel opens, which is what it would normally do if acetylcholine binds. And then, sodium ions on the outside end up coming inside the cell. So this would be an example of an agonist. It’s not acetylcholine, it’s something else, and let’s say, in this case, it’s succinylcholine, and that comes, binds to the receptor and causes a similar response. That is an agonist.

Now, let’s look at what an antagonist is. You can probably guess just by reading the word, but an antagonist is a molecule that opposes the effect of a neurotransmitter. So it does the exact opposite. An example of that would be curare, which is an antagonist to acetylcholine that can actually block the binding sites for acetylcholine. So here, we have our nicotinic receptor again, and it’s in the membrane of the cell, and here we have the binding sites.

Out here, we have acetylcholine that wants to bind. However, we have something else that’s around that’s not exactly like acetylcholine and let’s say that its shape looks something like this. That binds to the receptor, and what that does is it blocks the receptor site. So acetylcholine wants to bind and it wants to cause that channel to open, but it’s being blocked so that it cannot bind, and it cannot open the channel for sodium to come in. This would be an example of what curare does. It’s an antagonist, and in fact, curare can cause muscles to become paralyzed because they cannot be activated and sodium cannot rush into the cell, exciting the cell, and exciting the muscle to contract. So that can be a serious thing if you have curare binding to these receptor sites.

That’s really all for this video. I hope you understand the difference between an agonist and an antagonist. If you have any questions or comments about that, go ahead and leave them below. I’ll be happy to answer your question, and maybe even make a follow-up video answering your specific question. That’s it for this video, and I’ll see you on the next one.

150 comments
Darshna5
Darshna5

thank you very much this helped so much

Dhyan Shankar Dev
Dhyan Shankar Dev

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Divya divs
Divya divs

clear...and very good examples which r easy to undrstand......

Peehu Pandey
Peehu Pandey

especially when you are not giving better than him...........! i would appreciate that.!

Peehu Pandey
Peehu Pandey

learn to appreciate ,whatever the effort is ...........! No one is an absolute perfect.! right ....!

Sir Queef
Sir Queef

Black men don't know pharmacology.

An Vũ
An Vũ

thanks. you make it so much easier to understand

anna niko
anna niko

thanks! that was so understandable!

KARWAN JABBAR
KARWAN JABBAR

how does an agonist drug work at synapse? Give an example

Linda
Linda

Thank you Leslie, you are the best!!!! Btw, after watching some of your videos onhow action potential works in our brain. And other videos relating to the physiology of the brain I Aced my exam :) Thank you for all you do. I'm always watching and looking forward for more of your videos

iSkyexx
iSkyexx

Really simply and easy to understand! Thankyou so much, this is helping my Medications class :)

kim kelly
kim kelly

Very clear, can you please explain the functions of a receptor.

fuser lock
fuser lock

Plain n simple.... Thank you!!!!:)

Nikki Taylor
Nikki Taylor

Thanks, you make these hard subjects easy to understand :)

Sarah CirrusBoutique
Sarah CirrusBoutique

Brilliant again. These videos are really helping me get my head around this subject.

zizi502
zizi502

i want to know difference between types of antagonist ?

Biohazard826
Biohazard826

Thanks! This was very helpful to my Psychology study guide.

Khaldon
Khaldon

thank you very much I wish the best for this website and for the owner

pozionmynd
pozionmynd

don't confuse the nervous system with the muscular system hehe (inside joke)

liddlesez
liddlesez

It's my understanding is agonist and antagonists (same compounds can be both) depends on the effect they are going to have. A drug that might act as an antagoist for one compound might act as an antagonist. Some can be in the body, or administrated drugs via oral, iv and other routes of administration. I think that's the best way to exam it. Have a read of some pharmcology text books :)

liddlesez
liddlesez

It's my understanding is agonist and antagonists (same compounds can be both) depends on the effect they are going to have. A drug that might act as an antagoist for one compound might act as an antagonist. Some can be in the body, or administrated drugs via oral, iv and other routes of administration. I think that's the best way to exam it. Have a read of some pharmcology text books :)

BondComputer007
BondComputer007

What is the difference between agonist and reuptake inhibitor?

lovejoy44ie
lovejoy44ie

Thank you so much, we are currently studying this in college, and to be honest i was very confused, but you made it very interesting, and i finally understand what is actually going.. Thank you again :)

lovejoy44ie
lovejoy44ie

Thank you so much, we are currently studying this in college, and to be honest i was very confused, but you made it very interesting, and i finally understand what is actually going.. Thank you again :)

Michele
Michele

Leslie, Thank you so much for explaining and drawing out the differences between an agonist and an antagonist. You did an awesome job at breaking this concept down and now I can understand it completely! Sincerely, Michele

Yorreh20
Yorreh20

I Meant "Agonist" in the example of succinyl-choline

Yorreh20
Yorreh20

Succinyl-choline (the antagonist) is a medication used in Healthcare, especially in anesthesiology (where people are sedated for surgery). It causes the muscles to relax so it's easier to work with the body (i.e. intubation, cutting through muscle, opening the cuts) The antagonist is also a type of medication, lots of examples here. It also causes relaxation, but does so in a different manner (as explained in the video).

Yorreh20
Yorreh20

I Meant "Agonist" in the example of succinyl-choline

Yorreh20
Yorreh20

@Yorreh20 I Meant "Agonist" in the example of succinyl-choline

Yorreh20
Yorreh20

@msss432 Succinyl-choline (the antagonist) is a medication used in Healthcare, especially in anesthesiology (where people are sedated for surgery). It causes the muscles to relax so it's easier to work with the body (i.e. intubation, cutting through muscle, opening the cuts) The antagonist is also a type of medication, lots of examples here. It also causes relaxation, but does so in a different manner (as explained in the video).

Yorreh20
Yorreh20

Succinyl-choline (the antagonist) is a medication used in Healthcare, especially in anesthesiology (where people are sedated for surgery). It causes the muscles to relax so it's easier to work with the body (i.e. intubation, cutting through muscle, opening the cuts) The antagonist is also a type of medication, lots of examples here. It also causes relaxation, but does so in a different manner (as explained in the video).

dieurobotica
dieurobotica

hi, I only know about curare...I was taught that its an arrow poison...so, imagine one trying to shoot an animal and all of a sudden, 'mistakenly' shoots a person around...it will act... (thats the little I know about how it can get there)...

dieurobotica
dieurobotica

@msss432 hi, I only know about curare...I was taught that its an arrow poison...so, imagine one trying to shoot an animal and all of a sudden, 'mistakenly' shoots a person around...it will act... (thats the little I know about how it can get there)...

dieurobotica
dieurobotica

hi, I only know about curare...I was taught that its an arrow poison...so, imagine one trying to shoot an animal and all of a sudden, 'mistakenly' shoots a person around...it will act... (thats the little I know about how it can get there)...

wonderkid8991
wonderkid8991

wow...i just got taught by Mike Tyson...i feel privileged..great vid

wonderkid8991
wonderkid8991

wow...i just got taught by Mike Tyson...i feel privileged..great vid

xamandaxgatewayx
xamandaxgatewayx

so when you take a certain drug it can either work as an agonists by enhancing the effect of a neurotransmitter, or it can work as an antagonist and prevent the neurotransmitter from working.

Leslie Samuel
Leslie Samuel

Woohoo, that's so awesome. Congrats on Acing your exam. You rock!

Lrsamuel
Lrsamuel

Thanks for the feedback Michele! All the best.